• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Part: III Ethical Dilemmas > When There's a Betrayer in the Group

Chapter 17. When There's a Betrayer in the Group

We read about leaks in government and business all the time. Someone expresses his or her disapproval by leaking a memo or embarrassing story, and most of the time the leaker isn't caught and it's not worth pursuing. While many of the big stories of secret information that leaks end up on the evening news, everyone has private thoughts or personal information they don't want shared with others at work. When that happens—when a leak is very up-close and personal— it can feel really devastating to the victim. It can also undermine trust and sharing within a group, because no one knows who the leaker is and whether he or she will leak again.

That's what happened when Sylvia joined an online support group for research and editorial employees who worked at different companies. The idea was to have a private network for employees who were doing a similar job at different companies around the country to share their experiences, both good and bad. They could even talk about their reactions to different managers and supervisors and give each other advice on how best to get ahead in the field. Everyone got a password, and out of about 400 interested employees around the United States, about 40–50 members became part of a regular core group, while another 100 or so network members checked in from time to time with questions or opinions.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint