• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 14. Underpinnings of Aggression > Three Theories on Aggression

Three Theories on Aggression

Frustration and Aggression

The classical frustration-aggression hypothesis holds that aggressive behavior always presupposes the existence of frustration and that frustration drives the organism until it performs hostile and aggressive acts. The main difference between the frustration-aggression hypothesis and Freudian psychoanalysis is whether aggression inevitably arises as time passes or only when we experience frustration. Later writers suggest that frustration can lead to nonaggressive actions as well as aggressive ones.

Aggression arises when someone or something threatens the values that are most important to an individual: power, wealth, respect, well-being, and intimacy. Over time, frustrations can build up from a variety of sources and eventually overwhelm your ability to contain it. Sometimes, the walls of the dam containing frustration are overwhelmed by an accumulation of disappointments and upsetting situations. Perhaps in a short period of time a work project runs into serious problems, a loved one decides someone else is more attractive, and a your stock’s value goes so far south that the racetrack seems to be a better way to invest money. The combined weight of the various disappointments and frustrations can lead you to lose your temper over the next drop of disappointment that falls from the sky.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint