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Value Conflicts

Everyone has his (or her) own value system. And everyone has his own priority list of what is really important in life. Different people seek different lifestyles. It is only natural that value conflicts exist between people who are forced to associate with each other closely in the world of work. Here are two typical examples.

Tony. Tony was assigned to work next to Mr. Henderson who was more than twice his age. Tony was single, energetic, and enjoyed a rather flamboyant social life. It was no secret that Tony did not want to assume family responsibilities too soon and he was determined to have a lifestyle different from that of his parents. Tony’s foreign sports car and fashionable clothing reflected this attitude. Mr. Henderson, on the other hand, was a family oriented, religious person.

How did they learn to work together gracefully? At the beginning, they both played it cool and built their relationship exclusively on the basis of job factors. Tony learned to respect Mr. Henderson for his many years of job experience and his willingness to share it. Mr. Henderson learned to respect Tony for his willingness to learn and contribute a full day’s work. After six months they could even discuss their value differences. A better mutual understanding resulted.


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