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Chapter 6. Productivity—A Closer Look > Measuring Productivity

Measuring Productivity

Because productivity [*] is so important, management has devised ways of measuring it. Productivity is easily measured on an assembly line where the worker must perform a specific function, such as connecting a wire or screwing on a nut. Assembly or production line jobs can be time studied and a standard rate established. If the standard rate is eighty-five completions in sixty minutes, it means that the average worker can reach and sustain this number over a certain period of time.

[*] The reader is reminded that when using the word productivity, the authors mean quality performance. Management is only interested in producing more products or services when it reaches standards of excellence.

Measurable jobs or tasks of this nature are found primarily in the manufacturing and fabricating industries. Other jobs, such as customer service and office work, are more difficult to measure because factors such as how much initiative is demonstrated, how people are treated, and how the telephone is answered are difficult to measure.


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