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Dual Competency

Wherever you may be employed now or in the future, your superiors will probably be sensitive to the fact that you are building and maintaining better relationships with people than your co-workers and that you know how to operate effectively in a group—that you have a double competency. You are skillful technically. You are also skillful with people. Observing this double competency, your superiors will naturally assume that if you are good at human relations at the employee level, you will also be good at the management level. It is a wise assumption. Let’s look at what happened to Cleo.

Cleo. A highly competent computer technician, Cleo concentrated on her personal productivity, but she did not neglect her human-relations skills. She would frequently stop her own work to help someone with a problem. She would sometimes pitch in at the end of the day to help others get out an urgent report. Her efforts to help her co-workers did not go unrecognized.

Cleo was invited to attend a supervisory course on company time. Two weeks after the course was over, she became a supervisor. She was elated, not only because she had very little seniority, but also because she was the youngest person in her department. Her quick promotion made her respect her human-relations skills more than ever.


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