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Chapter 6. The Presentation Hand > SUCCESS CARD 26: Build Your Case

SUCCESS CARD 26: Build Your Case

When you make the effort to build your case, you'll find that it gives you the capacity to persuade others to do, think, or feel whatever it is you want them to do, think, or feel. This is true whether you want to influence people to buy your product, clean up their rooms, change their opinions about the village referendum, or feel angry about the current crime statistics. To be effective at persuasion, your presentation needs to follow certain steps that involve both logic and emotion. Follow the steps in order, incorporate logical support and evidence, appeal to audience members' emotions, and you will likely succeed in persuading them to your side.

Before you begin your presentation, analyze the audience's attitudes about the subject. Do members already have an opinion? Do they agree with it, are they neutral, or are they opposed to it? If the audience already agrees with your position, your objective is to fortify the argument and motivate them to take action. If they're neutral or don't care, you need to convince them that it is important. Explain the relevance to their lives and present all possible solutions followed by the reason yours is the best choice. If the audience is opposed to your idea, your objective is to have members recognize the value of your position and, you hope, reconsider their views. Find the common ground between you, and watch that your words don't come across as an attack on their beliefs. Whatever the audience's attitudes, when you show that you recognize members' feelings and viewpoints, they will be open to listening to what you have to say.


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