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Chapter 7. The Listening Hand > SUCCESS CARD 30: Listen for Style

SUCCESS CARD 30: Listen for Style

Everyone is different. Hippocrates first talked about temperament styles in 400 B.C. His model classified four body humours that resulted in four different temperaments: choleric, sanguine, phlegmatic, and melancholic. As time went on, researchers including the Greek physician Galen, the German philosopher Kant, and the American psychologist William Marston continued to describe personality and emotions in four types or categories. Today, it is widely accepted that people have different ways to succeed in their environment. It's been proven over the centuries: If you listen for style, you will get along with people better.

Generally, you'll find it fairly easy to observe categories of people. There are those who are more direct versus indirect in how they approach you. Some people focus more on the work itself and others on the people who do the work. Some people are detail oriented; others like to think in big pictures. Some make decisions quickly; others need to think things through. Some people like to discuss thoughts; others prefer giving orders and instructions not to be discussed. If you observe and listen to others' behavior over time, you can adapt. Often someone's appearance will match his or her behavior. For example, an expensive suit and impeccable grooming will accompany elevated vocabulary and perfect grammar. But sometimes the two elements don't match up at all. Mixed messages in any combination should always cause a red flag—a caution signal—to go up for you. Keep your eyes and ears tuned in for the real truth about the other person's style; it will reveal itself to you if you're open to seeing it.


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