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The Floodgates Open

Opera 6 came next—no DOCTYPE switching and no DOM, but fine support for most other standards. Opera eschewed DOCTYPE switching because, alone among commercial browsers, Opera had always sought to display pages according to W3C spec. Therefore, Opera's makers saw no reason to offer a backward-compatible “quirks” mode. (Opera 5 and 6 did not support the standard W3C DOM, but Opera 7, released in 2002, does.)

Finally, Microsoft released IE6 for Windows, a browser that mostly caught up with its Macintosh product's accurate CSS rendering, that offered strong support for XML, ECMAScript, and the DOM, and joined IE5/Mac, Mozilla, and Netscape 6+ in providing DOCTYPE switching. (On the browser's release, the Windows-centric trade press finally noticed DOCTYPE switching and gave IE6/Windows the credit for it.)


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