• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 8. The Web Page

Chapter 8. The Web Page

As designers, we should think of a Web page as the entrance to a cove of treasures, be they products, services, or information. If the entrance is clean, appealing, easy to understand, and compatible with the visitor's interests, then the user will venture deeper into the cove. If visitors perceive the entrance to be confusing, irritating, useless, or inefficient, however, then the chances increase that they will leave and try another cove. First impressions are even more important on the World Wide Web than in the real world. In the real world, there are often reasons why customers may not leave a bad situation. For example, in a sales encounter, salespeople who give a bad first impression can recognize their mistake and modify their behavior, prompting a change in the customer's initial unfavorable response. A Web page cannot detect a visitor's negative reaction and then modify its presentation in response to that reaction.

If, after they enter the cove—the Web page—visitors have a pleasant and memorable experience and find the treasures they seek, then they will prolong their visit and return often. The look and feel of different types of Web pages should engender just such a pleasant and memorable experience. A positive experience can happen for many design-related reasons, ranging from good usability to attractive graphics. No matter what formula we use to produce a pleasant experience, a well-designed page is the goal. What are the ingredients of a well-designed page?


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint