• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 4. Involving Customers with Iter... > Progressive Refinement, from Low Fid...

Progressive Refinement, from Low Fidelity to High Fidelity

The great thing about prototypes is that they can be created quickly and used to get feedback from customers. Low-fidelity prototyping is one technique that many designers use to accomplish this task. In low-fidelity prototyping, you use paper, whiteboards, Post-it notes, and markers to create rough cuts of a Web site. That's it. Sketches are low-fidelity (“low-fi”) when they are far from the final design in both their visual and interactive details. For example, Figure 4.9 shows hand-drawn graphics and handwritten text, much of it represented by squiggly lines. In addition to sketching, you can use cut, copy, and paste techniques with scissors, glue, and photocopying machines.

Using a set of low-fidelity pages, you can test a design with representative customers. Sit them down in front of your sketches and ask how they would complete a particular task. On the basis of the customer's verbal responses or pointing, one of your teammates can “play computer” and flip to a new page to show the designed output of the site. Observing what customers do on these low-fi designs will give you valuable information about how to refine your early design ideas. This type of prototyping and testing can let you iterate through an entire cycle of design, prototype, and evaluate in less than a day.[3]

[3] Read Mark Rettig's article “Prototyping for Tiny Fingers” (see the Resources section later in the book) for a great how-to on creating low-fidelity prototypes and testing them with customers.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint