• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint

Lab 1.6 Exercises

1.6.1. Define the Role of the Hypertext Document Engineer

a) What is the relationship between the “hypertext document engineer” and the content developer/author?

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

A1:

Answer: The “hypertext document engineer” designs and maintains the structure of a hypertext document, which usually contains multiple hypertext pages. The hypertext pages that comprise a hypertext document are often written by multiple content developers/authors.

b) What are some inherent problems with the “markup as you go” method of Web page development?

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

A2:

Answer: Links can end up pointing to nowhere, pages may not be accessible from other pages, and it is extremely easy to lose track of the overall structure of the system. As with software development and “spaghetti code,” you can end up with “spaghetti pages.”

1.6.2. Apply HDE Techniques

a) How might a Web page designer address the problem of “dead-end” pages during the development stages?

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

A1:

Answer: Many commercial Web management products have the ability to create templates that can then be applied to each page. The template would include some kind of navigational aid such as a toolbar with links to specific pages or at the very least a link to the home page.

On some sites, I have utilized the Web server's ability to include specific HTML code at specific locations (such as the top and bottom of each page). I can then include a navigation bar that I can change as I need to without having to edit each file individually. An excellent reference on developing your site with these techniques is The UNIX Web Server Administrator's Interactive Workbook by James Mohr, also from Prentice Hall.
b) How can a Web page designer help keep a user/reader from feeling “lost in cyberspace”?

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

A2:

Answer: One important characteristic of any Web site is a consistent look and feel. If a Web site were constantly changing format between pages, you would quickly become just as disoriented as with a book that changes format between pages.

Although some designers like to try out “cool” things on their sites, that tends to be the exception. Look at some of the large Web sites like amazon.com or cnn.com. There are tens of thousands of pages, all with the same look and feel. No matter how deep you have clicked or how long you have spent on each site, you know you are still on the same site.
c) How can a Web page designer help prevent “information overload”?

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

A3:

Answer: The simplest way is to break the material into fragments that address as few topics as possible. Unlike a book, which requires the material to be physically connected, Web documents can contain information spread across multiple pages. As we mentioned previously, this is one of the key benefits of any hypertext system.

Another way is to limit how “cool” your site is. Fancy fonts and spinning graphics might be fine for the MTV Web site, but not for most. A large number of different fonts and “loud” graphics detract from the content.
d) Like printed media, a Web page design is concerned with how the material looks on the page. How might a Web page designer determine how big a page should be?

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

A4:

Answer: Some of the commonly used methods for establishing the size of Web pages are:

  1. The amount of information on a “paper” page

  2. The size of a hypertext “fragment”

  3. The amount of information that can “fit” into a particular browser/client window on a certain size terminal screen (e.g., 640 x 480 pixels)

  4. The amount of information that be downloaded from a server within a specific time period at a particular bandwidth


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint