• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Part III: Work Organization > Contrarion Conspiracy

Chapter 17. Contrarion Conspiracy

New England is famed for its winters and its roads. We have colorful regional habits when it comes to marking our streets and byways. For example, New England street signs typically identify only cross streets, not the main thoroughfares. After all, so the Yankee logic goes, everyone should know Main Street or Massachusetts Avenue. What would be the point of marking them? A sign on an interstate may warn you that the exit for Middleboro is coming up in one mile, but at the exit it's labeled “Sherwood and Beanville Exit.” Then, at the bottom of the off ramp you are offered the choice of left to Merton or right to Chester! If you don't know where to turn, perhaps you have no business being there. I am convinced this logic is also followed by certain software developers, who use one term in the manual, another in the on-line help, and an unrelated icon on the button bar. Navigating their menus and dialogue boxes is like getting to Freeport from West Roxbury via Providence. As they say Down East, “You can't get there from here.”

Some of our expressway interchanges are works of art. We don't quite have the traffic volume of, say, an LA, but we make up for it with the most convoluted highway interchanges in the world. These asphalt pretzels are capable of turning even light traffic into a snarl. A few cars with out-of-state license plates or one stalled vehicle anytime after three on a weekday and it's parking lot city.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint