• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 46. Useful Cases > Helping Hand

Helping Hand

Though often slighted, documentation and Help are important contributors to the usability of systems, so important that the longest chapter in Software for Use (Constantine and Lockwood 1999) is devoted to Help design. In fact, good documentation and well-organized, responsive Help can make a difficult system significantly easier to use, and, conversely, inadequate or badly organized Help can ruin an otherwise reasonably designed system.

Organizing documentation and on-line help by essential use cases is an innovative and effective route to improved software usability. The essential use cases for a system represent all the things that users might want to and can accomplish with the software. Each well-written essential use case is a single task that is complete and well-defined from the external user's point of view and narrated in the language of users and the application domain. Essential use cases are ideal, then, for organizing task-oriented or “how-to” help, with each case being given a separate entry and documented by a set of instructions for enacting the use case. Even the relationships within the use case map—extension, specialization, and composition—are appropriately and naturally reflected in the documentation or Help files as links or cross-references.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint