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Part IV: Tools, Models, and Methods > Software Objectives

Chapter 24. Software Objectives

A programmer who snoozed through the better part of the last decade or two might not know about object-oriented programming. The rest of us have had it up to our tushies in objects. I am actually somewhat sympathetic toward the van Winkles of the industry, because in 1986, when I stumbled back into the computer field, object technology was a star on a meteoric rise, while a decade earlier, when I had last absented myself, object-oriented programming was an obscure brown dwarf hidden away in the cosmos of nebulous computing techniques. Trend spotting is surprisingly easy when you peek once a decade or so.

Not that object-orientation is particularly new. Although some writers have credited the failure of structured methods for the genesis of object-orientation, in truth, structured programming and design arose right alongside objects, slithering out of the same primordial swamp of unstructured methods. Dijkstra, Constantine, Kaye, Dahl, and Sutherland were all working in parallel in the late 1960s and early 1970s, devising and dispersing the core concepts of these new ways of thinking about programs and programming.


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