• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 3. Negotiating Consensus > Straight Priorities

Straight Priorities

It helps to have your priorities straight. The metrics mavens will probably push you to reduce the decision criteria to a mathematical formula with weights and exponents for each factor, but this is generally neither necessary nor particularly useful. A simple rank ordering of the criteria is sufficient. During analysis and design, when most trade-offs are and should be resolved, we seldom, if ever, have enough data to quantify our assessments with any precision or confidence anyway. Plugging a bunch of seat-of-the-pants “guesstimates” into a bogus formula can give the dangerously deceptive appearance of disciplined objectivity. It can even become an escape hatch by which development teams avoid accountability. “Well, we just did what the formula said we should; it's not our fault that each screen update takes 17 seconds.”

Accountability is promoted when development teams participate in establishing their principal goals and, on the basis of these, rank the criteria by which issues are to be decided. Once agreed upon, the criteria and their ordering are no longer open to debate. Most of the time they won't even enter into technical discussions. It is not necessary to analyze every little trade-off in terms of seven or eight criteria. The agreed-on list of criteria is taken off the shelf only when needed to help resolve a decision that is unclear or is taking too long.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint