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Chapter 60. Industry Icons > Names and Numbers

Names and Numbers

We have so many famous names, from Coad and Yourdon, Codd and Date, to Comaford, Cringely, and Curtis, from Myers, to Meyer, to Ward/Mellor, Wasserman, and Weinberg. From newcomers and rising stars to the pantheon at the top whose names are recognized by anyone who has been in the industry for more than a week, this is a business of gurus and personalities as much as of chips and technologies. There are global gurus and those whose reputation is concentrated in specific segments. Y. Alan Griver may deservedly draw drools from among the groupies of the Visual FoxPro community, but would provoke only a “Who? Wha'?” among hardcore embedded-systems code jockeys.

The big stars get loyal followers, and they get things named after them. We have had Booch-grams and Chen notation. Some analysts followed Coad/Yourdon and others Shlaer/Mellor in creating their object models. Data-flow diagrams used the Yourdon/DeMarco bubbles or the Gane/Sarson rounded-rectangles, and time was when some business analysts would rather fight than switch. Maybe you still believe in Jackson Systems Design; maybe you still normalize your definitions to Backus-Naur form.


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