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Chapter 16. Having It All > Meeting Management

Meeting Management

Structured open teams do much of their work face-to-face. This does not mean wasting time in meetings; it means working sessions, collaborating as a group on defining functionality and requirements, analyzing problems, laying out system architecture, reviewing designs, even coding critical sections. The idea is to lower defects and improve quality by increasing the visibility of work (see Chapter 26) and by taking advantage of the varied skills and perspectives that team members bring to a project.

Other functional roles may be shared by the team and rotated among members. These include maintaining access to applications expertise, especially important in object-oriented development and for user interface design, and providing liaison with the larger organization (the “team politics” discussed in the preceding chapter). Recognizing that critical feedback is an essential ingredient in improving software quality, the role of “resident critic” is formally recognized as an official part of the team. The resident critic is responsible for such things as pointing out problems and alternatives, keeping the group from closing in too quickly on an easy but inferior solution. But no team member gets to be permanent curmudgeon; it's a temporary role that is rotated. For awhile you get to be the skeptical critic, then it's my turn.


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