• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 7. Frames > Introduction to Frames

Introduction to Frames

Netscape introduced the idea of frames way back when it released Netscape Navigator 2.0. At the same time, Netscape proposed frames to the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) for inclusion in the HTML 3.0 standard. When the HTML 3.2 draft was released, frames were not part of the standard, but W3C indicated it was still considering other proposals that were put forward for HTML 3.0. When it released the HTML 4.0 specification, the W3C included the frame tags as proposed by Netscape, along with a few new twists that Microsoft and other W3C members threw in. Frames have also made the crossover to XHTML as well, so you can continue to implement documents inside a frameset, rather than just the standard browser window.

Since their introduction, frames have evolved much like tables. Initially, a number of browsers implemented both tables and frames, even though they were not part of the HTML standard. Frames are part of the XHTML standard and most major browsers use them now, so you can feel more comfortable about using frames. Used wisely, frames can provide you with an improved interface and a better experience with your site. However, some developers do not use frames wisely, and that has resulted in an outcry from people who try to promote usable Web pages. If you hear dissent about frames these days, it is most likely related to these usability issues and not to frames being nonstandard XHTML.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint