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Q&A

Q1:Other books talk about some text formatting tags that you didn't cover in this chapter, such as <code> and <address>. Shouldn't I know about them?
A1: There are a number of tags in HTML that indicate what kind of information is contained in some text. The <address> tag, for example, was supposed to be put around addresses. The only visible effect of <address> in most browsers, however, is making the text italic. Web page authors today most often simply use the <i> tag instead. Similarly, <code> and <kbd> do essentially the same thing as <tt>. You may also read about <var>, <samp>, or <dfn> in some older HTML references, but nobody uses them in ordinary Web pages.

One tag that you might occasionally find handy is <blockquote>, which indents all the text until the closing </blockquote>. Some Web page authors use <blockquote> on all or part of a page as a quick and easy way to widen the left and right margins.

Q2:How do I find out the exact name for a font I have on my computer?
A2: On a Windows or Macintosh computer, open the control panel and click the Fonts folder. The TrueType fonts on your system are listed. Use the exact spelling of font names when specifying them in the <font face> tag. If you use Adobe Type Manager, run the ATM Control Panel to find the name of Postscript fonts in Windows.
Q3:How do I put Kanji, Arabic, Chinese, and other non-European characters on my pages?
A3: First of all, everyone you want to be able to read these characters on your pages must have the appropriate language fonts installed. They must also have selected that language character set and font under Options, General Preferences, Fonts in Netscape Navigator or View, Options, General, Fonts in Microsoft Internet Explorer. You can use the Character Map accessory in Windows 95 (or a similar program in other operating systems) to get the numerical codes for each character in any language font. If the character you want has a code of 214, use &#214; to place it on a Web page.

The best way to include a short message in an Asian language (such as we speak tamil—call us!) is to include it as a graphics image. That way everyone will see it, even if they use English as their primary language for Web browsing.


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