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Q&A

Q1:I'd like to know exactly how wide the margins of a page are so I can line up my background and foreground images the way I want.
A1: Unfortunately, different browsers (and even the same browser on different types of computers) leave different amounts of space along the top and left side of a page, so you can't precisely line up foreground graphics with background images. Generally, you can expect the top and left margins to be 8 to 12 pixels.

The good news is that you'll learn an elegant and precise way to control margin width in Hour 16, "Using Style Sheets."

Q2:I used a graphical layout program to design my pages, and when I put the pages online my images look blotchy and seem to take forever to show up. What can I do?
A2: Here's what might be going on: When you place and resize an image in some graphical Web page layout programs (such as Adobe PageMill), the program simply changes the width and height attributes without actually resizing the image file itself. This usually makes the images look kind of crinkly, and can mean that what looks like a little 100×100-pixel image on the page may actually be a huge 2,000×2,000-pixel monster that takes half an hour to download.

Here's how you can fix it: Open the image in Paint Shop Pro (or your favorite image editing software) and resize the image there to that specified in the width and height attributes of the corresponding <img /> tag.

Q3:I've seen pages on the Web with multiple columns of text, wide margins, and other types of nice layouts you didn't discuss. How were those pages made?
A3: Probably with the HTML table tags, which are discussed in Hour 15, "Advanced Layout with Tables," or with style sheets, discussed in Hour 16.


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