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Introduction

Shape tweening works similarly to motion tweening. It follows the same structure of keyframing in the Timeline. You can animate many of the same changes such as alpha, color, scale, and position though its main purpose is to transform the shape of an object into another shape. Whereas motion tweening is applied to groups and symbols, shape tweening must be applied to an editable shape. You can determine whether an object is editable by selecting it with the Arrow tool- if it doesn't have a bounding box when selected, shape tweening can be applied. The reason for this is that when you convert a shape into a symbol, you are essentially protecting it from editing by storing it in its own Timeline. To apply shape tweening to a symbol, you must enter symbol editing mode and apply it to the shape contained inside the symbol. Shapes are created with any of Flash's drawing tools, such as the Oval or Rectangle tools. By making changes to the shape with any of Flash's editing tools, you can change the contours of the shape (for example, turn a circle into a square) and then use shape tweening to make this change happen gradually over time. Because the results of a shape tween can be unpredictable, you can set shape hints to let Flash know how to proceed with the tween. This is useful when you are working with complex shapes such as letterforms. In all cases you should only tween one shape at a time in a tweened span for best results.


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