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Managing Connections

The best way to understand SSAS is to consider how your application would suffer if it depended on an unreliable client SWF. Imagine, for instance, a card game with one user as the dealer. If the dealer closes his browser, the others are out of luck. If you put the code responsible for dealing in SSAS, however, the game could continue to run regardless of whether anyone was connected.

CSAS is just all the code in a SWF movie. All your SSAS goes into a plain-text file called main.asc that resides in your application directory. Each app maintains up to one copy of a main.asc file. (For example, the previous examples didn’t have a main.asc at all.) In addition, you can share code between apps through the include() command (which is nearly identical to Flash’s #include directive). Although you can edit the main.asc with any text editor, you really ought to use Dreamweaver because it includes syntax coloring and code hints (see Figure 9.1).


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