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Chapter 11. Faking Video in Flash > Using Video Stills for Film Sequences

Using Video Stills for Film Sequences

Although Flash doesn’t have the capability to stream video, it is possible to have video graphics and even entire video sequences in a Flash animation. By importing a QuickTime movie into Flash, you can break the video down into frame-by-frame components. Although this might significantly increase file size and be processor intensive, thoughtful use of this capability can be extremely effective. Give it a try.

Exercise 11.9 Working with Video in Flash

The movie you’ll be importing into Flash in this exercise is a QuickTime movie of a futuristic hover craft. Flash doesn’t support the playback of QuickTime movies, so you have to use a little trickery to incorporate this movie into your Flash movie.

1.
Create a new movie.

2.
Import the QuickTime movie speeder.mov from the Chapter_11/Assets folder.

Note

If you find that you can’t import speeder.mov (we’ve had more than our share of trouble importing QuickTime movies), read through the rest of this exercise and pick up with Step 8. Use the JPEG sequence in the Chapter_11/Assets folder.

3.
Use your Movie Properties (Modify > Movie) to resize your Flash movie to fit the size of the imported QuickTime movie (Width: 322 pixels; Height: 151 pixels). Center the movie on the Stage.

Tip

You can quickly get to the Movie Properties dialog box by double-clicking the Frame Rate indicator under the timeline.

4.
Flash imports the movie onto a single frame. Expand the timeline (F5) until you can see all the frames of the movie. (See Figure 11.14.)

Figure 11.14. When you import a QuickTime movie into Flash, resize the Flash movie so that it matches the size of the imported QuickTime movie. This way, you’ll be exporting only the necessary information.


You might think your job here is done. It’s not. If you try to publish your movie, it will be blank. Flash doesn’t support the playback of QuickTime movies. Keep going.

5.
Create a new folder on your hard drive called JPEG Sequence (Windows) or PICT Sequence (Macintosh).

6.
Export your movie as a series of JPEGs or PICTs by choosing File > Export Movie. For type, select JPEG or PICT Sequence. Name the file Speeder and save it to the JPEG/PICT Sequence folder. (Macintosh users should export the movie as a series of PICT files.)

7.
Accept the default settings in the JPEG/PICT Export dialog box. Now that the QuickTime movie has been converted to a sequence of images, you can bring it back into Flash.

8.
Create a new movie. Choose File > Import and browse to the JPEG/PICT Sequence folder. Choose the first image in the sequence.

9.
Flash pops up a message: “This file appears to be part of a sequence of images. Do you want to import all of the images in the sequence?” Click Yes.

You now have a 16-frame sequence. All the images now are on their own keyframes in one layer. (See Figure 11.15.)

Figure 11.15. After you’ve imported the JPEG/PICT sequence into Flash, each image of the sequence is on its own keyframe.


10.
Save your file as speeder.fla and test your movie.


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