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Chapter ONE. the art of motion graphics > addressing MULTITASKING ATTENTION DEF...

addressing MULTITASKING ATTENTION DEFICIT

Those of us who have worked with computers are used to multitasking. Looking at two or more programs simultaneously is the norm—while talking on the phone and surfing the web.

For example, Adam, the 19-year-old brother of hillmancurtis.com's art director, Ian Kovalik, routinely carries on several Instant Message conversations while researching topics on the Internet and listening to music through headphones. In fact, most of us, when we sit down in front of the computer, are involved in multiple tasks. The web motion designer must be aware of multitasking attention deficit (M.A.D.) and strive to present a message in a manner that will not be ignored. A piece that has all the bells and whistles with a huge "wow" factor but requires a long download does not meet this requirement. Nor does an indulgent, overwrought, or long spot (skip intros…as I like to call them) which I have certainly been guilty of in the past. You have to move beyond the "wow" factor to present your targeted message in 5–10 seconds. Lean and mean…kick it out. Or, in the case of Flash interfaces, not only do you need to move beyond the "wow" factor, but you have to focus on user experience. For example, I recently visited a site that offered a product I'm interested in and I couldn't navigate through the site because it had so much "wow" happening. Result: I won't be returning to the site.


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