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HTML

Early in the lifespan of Macromedia Flash, back when it was known as Future Splash, the product had little use because ActionScript was not yet a language. However, it was a great graphics tool, and many early developers talked of how Flash worked well as a tool for creating animated GIFs and images for the Web. When Macromedia introduced Flash 3, the game started to change a little bit. Not only were graphic designers finding a use for the tool, but programmers had some leeway by being able to design some interactivity into their projects. That interactivity exploded with Flash 4, when ActionScript was brought into the mix. Flash was now a tool developers could use to create entire Web sites.

Well, not exactly an entire Web site, because the Web site still has to get from an SWF file format to your Web page in order for end users to view it. This is where the HTML tab in the Publish Settings dialog box comes into the picture. Flash, upon publishing HTML, will create a document that embeds the Flash SWF into the HTML code to allow the SWF document to be seen by the browser. The code it creates is made up of OBJECT and EMBED tags, which allow you to specify a Flash SWF to be viewed. Here's an example:


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