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Extra Bits

Add Frames p. 42

  • Every Flash movie contains multiple timelines. Every scene has a main Timeline, and each symbol has its own independent Timeline, as you saw when editing our background. Within a scene or symbol, each layer also has its own Timeline. In complex Flash movies like the one we're building, it is best to use the scene's main Timeline for organizational and reference purposes only. Use the timelines available inside symbols for animation.

    We define two kinds of frames in a Timeline—basic frames and keyframes. Keyframes are where we do all of our work. Whenever you want to manually change the contents of a frame, you must do it in a keyframe. Basic frames make up what is known as a keyframe's span—the frames between that keyframe and the next. Frames act merely as clones of the preceding keyframe.

  • By default, the first frame in any Timeline is a keyframe.

  • If you change an object in a frame, you're actually making that change to the keyframe and all frames in its span. It can be incredibly painful to make a change in a particular frame, thinking that you're only changing that frame, and 30 minutes later realize you actually changed 15 frames, so be careful that you are always editing in a keyframe.

  • In the Timeline, keyframes are marked with a bullet. A solid bullet signifies that the keyframe has contents, and a hollow bullet signifies an empty keyframe.The final frame in a keyframe span is marked with a hollow rectangle.

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