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Chapter 1. Why Flash? > Web Standard

Web Standard

As most Web developers will attest to, browser and software manufacturers frequently tout Web standards even as they continue to define their own versions of those standards. We all have our own ways of doing things, and nowhere is this more apparent than in the browser itself. Take the following scenario: After spending hours creating the perfect Web page, with graphics placed just so and perhaps some JavaScript added for a bit of simple interactivity, you view your work in your favorite browser, where it looks and functions just as it should. You feel pretty good until you decide to view the page through your least favorite browser: Now you're mortified. Besides not looking anything like it should, your Web page is producing JavaScript error after JavaScript error. Your beautiful interactive page has fallen victim to a compatibility problem between browsers—one that may well send you back to the drawing board.

Since the Web continues to evolve at a phenomenal rate, the lack of universal standards remains a roadblock to a number of powerful technologies. Many developers are sticking to the basics rather than running the risk of creating compatibility problems by including fancier features—a problem Macromedia addressed by creating the Flash Player, a plug-in that enables the program's content to be viewed consistently across browsers, operating systems, Web-enabled appliances, and even video game consoles (for example, Sega Dreamcast and Sony Play Station).


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