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Conclusion

“Australia’s company directors and executives are flocking to business ethics courses, which are booming after the spectacular collapses of high-profile companies HIH and One. Tel, and WorldCom and Enron in the United States” (Marino & Webb, 2002).

The ’hit-and-run’ approach to e-business and the view that long-term viability of the firm is not a goal (Sama & Shoaf, 2002) indicate that e-business will confront ethical dilemmas continually as new innovations arise. The value of traditional businesses lies in the cultivation of customer relationships and an implied trust in the tangible nature of its primary business, service or product. As e-businesses deal with intangible products and services over the Internet, the potential for ethical dilemmas and shonky practices to develop is far higher than a in a bricks-and-mortar business. The challenge is for e-businesses to establish trust based on consistent good ethical practice and an industry approach to abusers of the system. The media continues to provide opportunities for unethical practices to be exposed as does whistleblowing and good corporate governance. But ethics and innovation are not mutually exclusive and will continue to challenge e-businesses.


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