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Chapter 7. Controls > Adding QuickTime Video Controls

Adding QuickTime Video Controls

Adding static images to Web page is a straightforward affair: Save the image in one of three common formats (GIF, JPEG, or PNG) and then use the <img> tag. The advantage of static image formats is that they are deciphered by the browsers themselves. That is, the code used to display the images is built into the browser. Video images, on the other hand, are not natively supported by browsers, but rely on plug-insSseparate chunks of code that are used by the browser to determine how to display different MIME types. MIME (which actually stands for “multipurpose Internet mail extensions”) is used to define particular media types and associate them with the particular plug-in that supports their display in the Web browser. Although this provides greater versatility, since different formats can be added without updating the browser, it also means that the browser has to have the plug-in to display particular file types.

While often thought of as a stand-alone application for displaying video, QuickTime can also be used as a plug-in to display video and audio directly in a Web browser, using a wide variety of different MIME types (Figure 7.17). Although typically associated with files that have the .mov extension, QuickTime can also play MPEG, Flash, and AIFF files, among many others. The other great thing about the QuickTime plug-in is that it comes preinstalled with most Web browsers and has its own built-in controls (Figure 7.18).


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