• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter Two. Technology Primer: About Sp... > Why Designing a Speech-Recognition A...

Why Designing a Speech-Recognition Application Is Challenging

Think back to the AirTran example in Chapter 1. It was very short, wasn't it? Look how many points of discussion it raised—and we're only scratching the surface. Speech-recognition applications are powerful because they are apparently simple. Touchtone systems really are simple because callers know that their responses are limited to pressing any of 12 keys. And in a person-to-person conversation, people can reasonably expect that the person on the other end of the line can understand most spoken ideas. Speech-recognition systems fit somewhere in the middle. They have a seemingly natural interface, but the recognition application doesn't yet converse on a human level.

Callers don't know what the system can and can't understand if the system doesn't let them know the parameters (or degrees of freedom) of the interaction. Until the system tells them, callers don't know if they can ask natural questions, such as “What's the traffic like on I-93 South?” or if they must first indicate they want “Traffic information” and then indicate the route. It's up to the system (via the designer) to inform them.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint