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Chapter Nine. Deployment > Partial Deployment

Partial Deployment

In partial deployment, our line of questioning shifts from “Does the system work?” (because we know it does) to “How can we improve it?” Partial deployment is basically the same thing as pilot deployment—only this time the system takes more calls over a longer period of time. How much time? It varies, depending on the client and the application. Some applications are so complex that they need to be rolled out very slowly over a period of months, while others may be so small and simple that they can be fully deployed in a matter of days. Because we're talking about a much larger volume of calls, more of the analysis will be performed by software tools and less by listening to individual calls.

Unlike pilot deployment, where we focus on tuning up all the severe problems, partial deployment focuses more on trends such as periodic equipment failure (a bad hard drive?) or subtle shifts in callers' usage patterns. Because partial deployment is closer to real life usage, we're able to monitor system performance under a wider range of conditions, including times of high call volume. We can see, for example, how promptly and efficiently calls are handled when the computing power and phone lines are reaching their limits. If things are going well at this point, we may be tempted to simply open the floodgates and go straight to full deployment—but that's a temptation generally to be avoided. We don't want our entire calling population to become totally dependent on a system that may not be quite ready for all of the people, all of the time.


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