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Internet User Scenarios to Consider

Internet User Scenarios to Consider

  • A sight-impaired person may use a Web browser that reads content on a Web page aloud, and this software is often “confused” by image maps, frames, JavaScripts, and other Web design elements.

  • A deaf person requires a text version of audio information in order to be able to access the site information.

  • Some people perceive certain colors differently and may not be able to see light-colored type on colored backgrounds.

  • Someone with limited hand movement may not be able to hold down more than one key on their keyboard at once. Well-designed Web menus will provide alternative navigation methods.

Designing your Web site to be accessible to people using assistive technologies and others with disabilities is very simple and costs very little if it is done as you build your Web site. Making accommodations on your Web site for the greatest number of users increases the availability and usefulness of those materials. If systems are flexible enough to meet the needs and preferences of the broadest range of users of computers and telecommunications equipment, regardless of age or disability, your potential audience is immediately increased by millions of users.


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