• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 5. User Experience: On the Bus > The Trouble with Tables

The Trouble with Tables

The trouble with tables is that they’re meant for the eye, not the ear. They also make significant cognitive demands. To understand a table, you have to be able to read in two dimensions (horizontal and vertical, x and y) simultaneously, matching up the contents of individual data cells with row and column names that often provide only slender clues about the relationships the data embody.

Web designers aiming for maximum accessibility have to understand and address these challenges. People who rely on screen readers and talking browsers—including both people who are blind or visually impaired and people with cognitive difficulties such as dyslexia— have to hold row and column headers in their minds as the screen reader reads from cell to cell across each row. As the screen reader moves down from one row to the next, it becomes harder and harder to remember those row and column headers; the table sounds more and more like a list of meaningless numbers.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint