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Chapter 15. Supporting Accessibility wit... > Using Style Sheets to Enhance Access...

Using Style Sheets to Enhance Accessibility for People with Low Vision or Cognitive Disabilities

In this chapter, we use CSS to address some of the problems that people with cognitive disabilities or low vision might encounter when using the AIR judging form. Before we discuss the design, however, let’s take a look at the terms low vision and cognitive disabilities.

Low Vision

The term low vision covers a very broad range of conditions. The number of people who have partial or limited vision far exceeds the number of people who have no useful vision at all. There is a substantially higher incidence of low vision among people over 50 than in the general population, resulting from such conditions as macular degeneration, glaucoma, and diabetic retinopathy, which often worsen with age. According to Jupiter Research, people over 50 represent a larger number of users (23,000,000 by the end of 2000) than kids, teens, or college students. [1] And people over 65 form the fastest-growing group in the population as a whole. So designers can expect more and more people with limited vision to visit Web sites.

[1] Cited in “Jupiter Research—Digital Divides,” accessed December 1, 2001, at http://www.agelight.org/news/6-15jupiter.htm.


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