• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 13. Enhancing Accessibility thro... > Alternatives for Stand-Alone and Oth...

Alternatives for Stand-Alone and Other Audio

The WCAG 1.0 checkpoints and Section 508 federal mandates that require a text equivalent for every nontext element apply not just to graphic elements but also to audio material—including audio material that’s not part of a video. We have already seen how the audio portion of a video display can be made accessible to users who will not hear the sounds. These may be users with hearing impairments but are just as likely to include those who are accessing the Web by means of a public computer station, such as those provided in libraries, schools, and many community recreation centers. Millions of people use public access technology; although some of these facilities may provide headphones for private listening, a developer who is aiming for maximum accessibility will not depend on sound alone to convey important information.

If information is provided as voice narration in a stand-alone audio file, then a text transcript is the most straightforward accessibility solution. Crafting alternatives for musical content requires a bit more thought, however. What is the purpose of the music? Is it simply decorative, akin to elevator music for the site? If so, a simple ALT text attached to the .wav file or other sound element (alt="background music", for example) should suffice, although you must also provide the means for users to choose to hear the mu-sic—or not, as we mentioned in our earlier discussion about giving users control over media playback.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint