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Chapter 4. Creating Relevant Site Content > Developing your client's look

Developing your client's look

After you and the client define her voice, it's time to think of how you'll incorporate this with the Web site you create. In essence, you're defining your client's look on the Web. The amount of creativity you can employ in defining your client's look on the Web depends on whether the client has an established, bricks‐and‐mortar business.

If your client has an established bricks‐and‐mortar business, you'll have to create a Web site that has a similar look and feel. The site has to incorporate the client's logo and images that are used in corporate brochures and advertising. Your client's presence on the Web is defined on how well you assimilate your client's bricks‐and‐mortar look with your Web design. When you're designing a Web site for a client who has already established a look, ask yourself these questions:

  • Does the Web site have the look and feel of the client's bricks‐and‐mortar business? When established customers visit the Web site, the site should seem like an extension of the client's bricks‐and‐mortar business. The design should feel right to the client as well as his customers.

  • Does the design effectively portray the client's voice? The design you create needs to portray the client's manner of doing business, his mission statement, and his style of doing business. Your design must also be consistent with the expectations of the client's current audience and intended audience.

  • Can the design be modified to fit the client's future goals and needs? If your client's long‐term goals are substantially different than current goals, you'll probably end up doing a complete redesign at some point in the future. However, if your client's future goals are to grow and increase customer base with the same or similar product designs, your initial design has to be flexible enough to incorporate future expansion, such as the addition of new sections, changes in product lines, and so on.


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