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Browser Languages

You can certainly use Dreamweaver MX 2004 to create great-looking, functional Web sites without ever editing a single line of code. A big part of Dreamweaver's appeal is that you can lay out your work in an interactive, WYSIWYG fashion (What You See Is What You Get), and let Dreamweaver work behind the scenes to build the underlying HyperText Markup Language (HTML) that tells the browser how to draw the page.

When you get deeper into the program, however, you come to realize that certain operations are easier when you know a bit about HTML and its more recent successor, Extensible HTML (XHTML). For example, if you've already developed some facility with HTML, you may prefer to write or fine-tune parts of your Web pages directly in Dreamweaver's Code View. You may also have HTML code that you've already written and that you'd like to bring into Dreamweaver for editing and reuse. You may want to understand some of the differences between “bad” HTML and “good” (well-formed) HTML so that your pages work more predictably. Or you may just want to bring your Web code up to a more structured standard (XHTML) for better future upgradability and compatibility. In all these situations, and more besides, some familiarity with HTML and XHTML will stand you in good stead, even if you never become fluent, per se, in these languages.


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