• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Part VI: Appendixes > HTML Reference

HTML Reference

HTML stands for Hypertext Markup Language. It is a standard tag-based language that you can use to display information on a Web page. The following is a list of HTML tags used to display information on a Web page:

  • <a> </a>— Lets you specify anchors and links.

  • <abbr> </abbr>— Lets you specify an abbreviation.

  • <address> </address>— Lets you specify an address. The text between the <address> tags is displayed in italics.

  • <applet> </applet>— Lets you execute a Java applet.

  • <area> </area>— Lets you create a client-side image map. You must use this tag pair with the <map> tag. The <area> tag must be placed within the map element.

  • <b> </b>— Lets you display text in bold.

  • <base>— Lets you specify the base URL for the HTML document. You must place the <base> tag between the <head> tags. The <base> tag does not have closing tags.

  • <basefont> </basefont>— Lets you set the appearance of the font for a specific block of text. If the <basefont> tag is placed between the <head> tags, the font values are set for the entire document. The closing tag for the <basefont> tag is optional.

  • <blockquote> </blockquote>— Lets you display text quoted from another source. This tag pair causes a paragraph break and provides space above and below the quote.

  • <br>— Lets you put a line break at the end of a sentence. There is no closing tag for the <br> tag.

  • <center> </center>— Lets you place blocks of text or elements, such as tables and images, in the center of the document.

  • <cite> </cite>— Lets you display a citation in a font that is different from the normal text—typically italics. Unlike the <blockquote> tag, the <cite> tag does not insert paragraph breaks before and after the text.

  • <code> </code>— Lets you display a part of a program or some code in the HTML document.

  • <col>— Lets you specify the text alignment for the columns in a table. There is no closing tag for the <col> tag.

  • <dl> </dl>— Lets you display terms and definitions in the HTML document. This tag is used along with two more tags, <dt> and <dd>. The <dt> tag lets you specify the term that must be defined, and the <dd> tag lets you specify the term’s definition. The <dd> and <dt> tags do not have any closing tags.

  • <em> </em>— Lets you emphasize certain text in a document by making it look different form the rest of the text in the document.

  • <font> </font>— Lets you specify the face, color, and size of the characters in text.

  • <form> </form>— Wraps all form elements and acts as a container for all form controls (fields). All form controls are placed within the <form> and </form> tags.

  • <frame> </frame>— Lets you create a frame. A frame is a window in an HTML document in which another HTML document is displayed.

  • <frameset> </frameset>— Acts as a container that describes all the frames in an HTML document.

  • <h#> </h#>— Lets you define the style of the text in a document’s headings. The <#h> tag displays text in six different sizes, ranging from h1 to h6.

  • <head> </head>— Acts as a container for the tags that control the appearance of the document’s main body.

  • <hr>— Lets you display a horizontal line. The <hr> tag does not have a closing tag.

  • <html> </html>— Informs the browser that the document is an HTML document containing an HTML encoded program.

  • <i> </i>— Lets you display text in italics.

  • <iframe> </iframe>— Lets you display a floating frame. A floating frame is similar to a frame, except that you can place it anywhere on the HTML document.

  • <img>— Lets you insert an image into the HTML document. You can use this tag pair to set various properties for the image, such as size and alignment. The <img> tag does not have a closing tag.

  • <input>— Lets you create various form controls, such as buttons, text boxes, list boxes, and check boxes. The <input> tag does not have a closing tag.

  • <kbd> </kbd>— Lets you specify text that the user needs to enter.

  • <label> </label>— Lets you specify labels for an element (control) in a form.

  • <li> </li>— Lets you display a list of items on the Web page.

  • <link>— Lets you define a relationship between documents. The <link> tag does not have a closing tag.

  • <map> </map>— Lets you create a client-side image map.

  • <meta>— Lets you provide information (metadata) about the current HTML document, such as its author and subject matter. The <meta> tag does not have a closing tag.

  • <noframes> </noframes>— Lets you display an alternative message to users who have browsers that do not recognize frames.

  • <noscript> </noscript>— Lets you display alternative text to users who have browsers that do not recognize the <script> tag.

  • <object> </object>— Lets you insert ActiveX components, applets, image maps, media players, plug-ins, and other objects into an HTML document. You can also use this tag pair to specify various attributes of the object inserted into the document.

  • <ol> </ol>— Lets you display an ordered list.

  • <option> </option>— Lets you add items to a drop-down list.

  • <p> </p>— Lets you mark the beginning and end of a paragraph.

  • <param> </param>— Lets you specify the parameters that might be required by the objects in the object tag, such as a Java applet.

  • <samp> </samp>— Lets you display some sample output.

  • <script> </script>— Lets you place JavaScript or VBScript code in an HTML document

  • <select> </select>— Lets the user select an option from the list of options displayed in a drop-down list.

  • <strong> </strong>— Lets you put strong emphasis on specific text in the document.

  • <style> <style>— Lets you create and define style sheet rules for a document.

  • <sub> </sub>— Lets you display subscripts, which are widely used for mathematical and scientific calculations.

  • <sup> </sup>— Lets you insert superscripts into the text.

  • <table> </table>— Wraps all the table tags. All the tags that are used to define a table’s properties are enclosed within this tag pair.

  • <tbody> </tbody>— Lets you specify the body portion of a table in which the data is displayed.

  • <td> </td>— Lets you create the cells that contain the information in a table.

  • <text area> </text area>— Lets you create a text box in a form.

  • <tfoot> </tfoot>— Lets you define a footnote for a table.

  • <th> </th>— Lets you create header cells for a table.

  • <thead> <thead>— Lets you define the header section of a table.

  • <title> </title>— Lets you specify the title for the HTML document. This title appears on the title bar of the Web page.

  • <tr> </tr>— Lets you create a row in a table.

  • <ul> </ul>— Lets you display an unordered list of items.

  • <var> </var>— Lets you specify that a particular word is a variable name used in code.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint