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Chapter 9. Creating and Managing Images > Working with Image Maps

Working with Image Maps

An image map is an image that can be divided into various regions called hotspots, where each hotspot points to a different URL. For example, you can use a geographic map of a country as an image map and define each state in the country as a hotspot. These hotspots can be links to pages where details on the selected state are specified. The hotspot on an image map can either be a rectangle, oval, circle, polygon, or a point. Some of the shapes provided by UltraDev are rectangle, circle, and polygon.

Image maps are of two types, client-side and server-side. In a client-side image map, when a user clicks a hotspot of the image map, the browser passes the URL of the document to the server, whereas in a server-side image map the browser sends the coordinates of the area clicked to the server. The server in turn interprets these coordinates and sends the document to the browser. The client-side image map is faster because each time an image is clicked the coordinates need not be sent to the server to be interpreted. However, not all browsers support client-side image maps. Currently, Netscape Navigator, Internet Explorer, OmniWeb, and NCSA Mosaic versions 2.1 and 3.0 support client-side image maps. With browsers that cannot support client-side image maps, server-side image maps can be used.


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