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Chapter 10. Moving on Down the Road: Int... > Third-Party Tag, You’re It!

Third-Party Tag, You’re It!

Look up any good reference of HTML and you’re going to get a standard set of tags. But, because HTML is so flexible—and browsers are so tolerant of tags they don’t understand—extension developers often employ a healthy dose of non-HTML or third-party tags. When might a third-party tag be used? Here’s one example: I co-developed a Dreamweaver extension called Deva, which builds navigation systems, such as table of contents and indexes. With Deva, any text can be marked as an index item, which surrounds the text with a <index>...</index> tag pair. The <index> tag is a Deva third-party tag and, as such, highlights the enclosed text. The highlight enables the designer to quickly identify specially marked passages. Third-party tags are defined by enclosing an XML file in the Dreamweaver MX 2004\Configuration\ThirdPartyTags folder. Here’s the entry for the Deva <index> tag:

<tagspec tag_name="index" tag_type="nonempty"
 render_contents="true"
content_model="marker_model"></tagspec>


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