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Chapter 12. Building Dreamweaver Web Sit... > Using File Check In and Check Out

Using File Check In and Check Out

As I've just mentioned, your collaborative team can use Dreamweaver's file Check In and Check Out functionality to work with individual files. The benefit to using file Check In and Check Out is simple and is best explained given the following scenario. Assume that you're working in a team of two or more developers. Also assume that although you're the primary developer for the project, a second developer decides to help you out and copies a file from the remote server to his local computer to do some work on the file. Unbeknownst to the other developer, you've already copied the file and begun doing work on it. When you've finished work for the day, you copy the file back to the remote server and assume everything is fine. The other developer, thinking he's helping you out, makes changes to the file and also uploads the file to the remote server, essentially overwriting all the work that you just spent a better part of a day working on. Situations such as this can easily be prevented by enabling and working with the file Ccheck In and Check Out features built directly into Dreamweaver.

Working with these features, however, requires some initial setup. Up until this point we've been working specifically with local files, meaning that you downloaded the files from the book's web site, you extracted them, copied them to a folder on your hard drive, and then defined a site directly to the local files in Dreamweaver. With file Check In and Check Out, this simplistic model wouldn't make sense. Remember that file Check In and Check Out assumes that you're working with teams. Members of your team won't be connecting directly to your computer; instead, they'll be connecting to a remote server, possibly even the company's web server. The remote server in this case not only acts as the web server, but as a central repository for web files. Because this is the case, we'll have to emulate our fictitious company's web architecture model by defining a remote server (the fictitious company's web server) and a local site (your computer). When we're finished, the model will resemble Figure 12.1.


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