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9. Frames > 9.1. The Frame Page

The Frame Page

What your Web page visitor cares about is what’s in the frames: the text and graphics. But for you, the biggest challenge is creating the special Web page—the frameset page—that gives the frames their structure. The frameset page itself usually doesn’t contain text or graphics; it just describes the number, size, and placement of the frames.

This page tells a browser which Web page should load into each frame, whether the frame has borders or scroll bars, and whether the visitor is allowed to resize the frame by dragging its border.

Frames let you keep one element in place—the banner and navigation bars shown here at www.mnh.si.edu/africanvoices/, for example—while other contents of the Web page change. This way, the banner and navigation bar remain visible in one frame, even as your reader scrolls to read a long page full of text or even reloads the page in another.

Figure 9-1. Frames let you keep one element in place—the banner and navigation bars shown here at www.mnh.si.edu/africanvoices/, for example—while other contents of the Web page change. This way, the banner and navigation bar remain visible in one frame, even as your reader scrolls to read a long page full of text or even reloads the page in another.


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