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Chapter 4. Folders and Files > Configuring Sitespring Helper

Configuring Sitespring Helper

Your operating system needs to tell different types of documents apart and know what applications can open them. For example, a JPEG file holds a visual image and can be opened by image editing software, while an HTML file holds formatted text and can be opened by an HTML editor. Application mapping tells Sitespring Helper what application to use to open a particular type of file. You can choose to have Sitespring Helper open a file in a specific application or in the operating system's default application for that file type.

To add an application mapping:

1.
Launch the Sitespring Helper application. To do that, do either of the following:

  • On a PC, click the Start button > Programs > Macromedia Sitespring > Sitespring Helper.

  • On a Mac, double-click the Sitespring Helper icon.

2.
Sitespring Helper opens. The Mac and PC versions of Sitespring Helper function differently to accommodate how each platform works with files. Follow the direction below for your platform:

  • If you're on a PC, click the New button on the right side of the window (Figure 4.66).

    Figure 4.66. On the PC, click the New button to add a file type.


    or

  • If you're on a Mac, you need to decide whether to create the file mapping to an extension or to a file type. See the sidebar “Macs and Application Mappings” that follows this section for more information.

    At the top of the window, use the Edit Associations By radio buttons to select whether you'd like your new mapping to be associated with an extension or file type (Figures 4.67 and 4.68). Click the New button.

    Figure 4.67. On the Mac, create a new mapping by filename extension by selecting Extension in the Edit Associations By field and then clicking the New button.


    Figure 4.68. On the Mac, to create a new mapping by file type, select File Type in the Edit Associations By field and click the New button.


3.
The Create a New Application Mapping window opens. Enter a description and an extension or a Mac file type for the file type you are creating (Figures 4.69, 4.70, and 4.71). Read below for more information about each field.

Figure 4.69. On the PC, enter the file extension and description for the application mapping you are adding.


Figure 4.70. To create a new mapping by extension on the Mac, enter the extension and a description for the application mapping you are creating.


Figure 4.71. To create a new mapping by file type on the Mac, click the Match button, locate a file of the same type, and enter a description for the application mapping you are creating.


File Extension— All PC users and Mac users who are creating a file association by Extension will see this field. The file extension is the three-letter identifier at the end of a filename that Windows uses to identify the format of the file and the applications that can open it. For example, a JPEG image usually has an extension of .jpg and can be opened by Fireworks and ImageReady, among other applications.

File Type— Only Mac users who are creating a file association by Mac file type will see this field. If you know it, enter the four-character abbreviation that identifies the type of file you want. If you don't know the abbreviation, you can use Sitespring Helper to find it. To find an abbreviation, click the Match button. The Select Document To Match dialog box opens. Locate a file that's of the type you want to associate. Select the file and click the Choose button. The dialog box closes, and the File Type field updates to reflect the chosen file type.

Description— All users will see this field. Fill in a description of the type of file you are associating with the file extension. File extensions by themselves can be difficult to remember. Seeing “Photoshop Document” in the list can remind you what a .psd document is.

4.
Assign an application to open the file. You can choose to have a file open in the operating system's default editor for that file type, or you can tell Sitespring Helper to override the default by assigning the file type to a particular application. To choose an application, do either of the following:

  • To use the system's default editor for the file type, click the check box next to “Always use system default editor for these files” below the Application field (Figure 4.72). This means that whatever program would normally launch this document if you opened it from Windows Explorer or the Mac Finder will launch the document.

    Figure 4.72. To use the default application to launch this type of file, check “Always use system default editor for these files.”


    or

  • To assign a specific application, click the Browse button. On a PC, the Open dialog opens, and on a Mac, the Select Document to Match dialog box opens. Locate the application with which you'd like to associate the extension. On a PC you'll find most applications in the Program Files folder on the C drive, and on a Mac most will be located in the Applications folder of your startup disk. When you've located the application, select it. On a PC click the Open button; on a Mac click the Choose button. The window closes, and the Application field displays the path to the application (Figures 4.73 and 4.74).

    Figure 4.73. On the PC, directories are separated by a backslash. The Application field displays the path to the application.


    Figure 4.74. On the Mac, folders are separated by a colon. The Application field displays the path to the application.


5.
Click the OK button to save the new file association (Figure 4.75), or click the Cancel button to discard it.

Figure 4.75. Click the OK button to save the new file-type configuration.


The Create a New Application Mapping window closes, and the list of file mappings updates to show your new entry.

To edit an application mapping:

1.
Launch the Sitespring Helper application. To do that, do either of the following:

  • On a PC, click the Start button > Programs > Macromedia Sitespring > Sitespring Helper (Figure 4.76).

    Figure 4.76. Launch Sitespring Helper by selecting it from the Start menu.


  • On a Mac, double-click the Sitespring Helper icon. If you accepted the default installation location, the icon will be in the Applications folder of your hard drive, inside a folder named Macromedia Sitespring Helper.

2.
Sitespring Helper opens. Locate and select the application mapping you'd like to edit. To do that, follow the directions appropriate to your platform:

  • PC users should look in the list of mappings. Select the application mapping you'd like to edit by clicking the appropriate row.

    or

  • Mac users should choose to edit an association by Extension or by File Type in the Edit Associations By field. See the sidebar “Macs and Application Mappings” for more information about these choices. As you toggle the radio buttons, the list of associations changes to display either mappings by extension or mappings by file type (Figures 4.77 and 4.78). Select the mapping you'd like to edit from either list.

    Figure 4.77. To edit a file-type application mapping on the Mac, select File Type in the Edit Associations By field, select the mapping to edit from the list, and click the Edit button.


    Figure 4.78. To edit an extension application mapping on the Mac, select Extension in the Edit Associations By field, select the mapping to edit from the list, and click the Edit button.


3.
Select the file type you'd like to edit from the list.

4.
Click the Edit button (Figure 4.79).

Figure 4.79. Select the file type to edit and click the Edit button.


Macs and Application Mappings

Both PCs and Macs need to associate files with the applications that can open them. PCs map files to applications by using a three-digit abbreviation, or extension, at the end of a filename. A JPEG image, for example, could be named image.jpg, while an HTML document might be called document.htm. Macs, however, identify file types via a four-character abbreviation that users normally don't see. The file type isn't a requisite part of a filename on a Mac.

Because Sitespring anticipates that Mac users will be working with both Mac and PC files, the Mac version of Sitespring lets you associate a file type using either method. The PC version of Sitespring does not have this option; it determines application mapping only by using extensions. When a PC interacts with a Mac file, it can't read the Mac's hidden abbreviation, so Sitespring Helper offers no option for PC users to configure it. On a Mac, if a filename has an extension, Sitespring Helper uses the extension to determine the application mapping regardless of whether the file also has a Mac file type. (On a Mac, you can save a file with a PC-style extension; the file will then have both an extension and a Mac file type. When you save a file on a Mac, it always has a Mac file type.) If a file doesn't have a filename extension but does have a Mac file type, Sitespring Helper uses the Mac file type.


5.
The Edit Application Mapping window opens. Edit the description by changing the description field.

6.
Choose which application will open files of this type.

To use the system's default editor for the file type, click the check box next to “Always use system default editor for [extension] files” and proceed to step 7 (Figure 4.80). If you would like to override the system's default and choose an application, uncheck this check box and proceed to step 6.

Figure 4.80. To use the default application to open this type of file, check “Always use system default editor for [extension] files.”


7.
Click the Browse button. On a PC the Open dialog opens; on a Mac it's the Select Document to Match dialog box. Locate the application with which you'd like to have this file type opened. On a PC, most of your applications will be in the Program Files folder on your C drive. On a Mac, your applications are likely to be in the Applications folder of your startup disk. Select the new application and click OK.

The dialog or dialog box closes, and the Application field updates with the path to the new application (Figures 4.81 and 4.82).

Figure 4.81. On a PC, the Application field displays the path to the application with backslashes between directory names.


Figure 4.82. On a Mac, the Application field displays the path to the application with colons between folder names.


8.
Click the OK button to accept your changes, or click the Cancel button to discard them.

The Edit Application Mapping window closes, and the list of file types updates with your newly edited information.

Tip

  • The list of file types defaults to sorting by the Extension or File Type column. You can sort the list by either the Description or Application columns by clicking the appropriate column heading.


To delete a file type:

1.
Launch the Sitespring Helper application. To do that, do either of the following:

  • On a PC, click the Start button > Programs > Macromedia Sitespring > Sitespring Helper.

  • On a Mac, double-click the Sitespring Helper icon. If you accepted the default installation location, the icon will be in the applications folder of your hard drive, inside a folder named Macromedia Sitespring Helper.

2.
Locate and select the application mapping you'd like to delete. To do that, follow the directions appropriate to your platform:

  • On a PC, select the file type you'd like to delete from the list by clicking the corresponding row.

    or

  • Mac users should choose to delete an association by Extension or by File Type in the Edit Associations By field. See the sidebar “Macs and Application Mappings” for more information about these choices. As you toggle the radio buttons, the list of associations changes to display either mappings by extension or mappings by file type. Select the mapping you'd like to delete from either list by clicking the corresponding row.

3.
Click the Remove button (Figure 4.83).

Figure 4.83. Click the Remove button to delete the file association.


The file type is deleted, and the list of file types updates to reflect the deletion (Figure 4.84).

Figure 4.84. The list of file types updates, and the deleted file type is removed.


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