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Chapter 5. Working with Images

Chapter 5. Working with Images

Most basic Web pages are composed of a combination of text, links, and images. Used to be, if you found an image online, you had to download it, get offline, and then open the image in a viewing program.That all seems like ancient history these days.

Now that images are easy to use, some Web pages use them at the expense of their visitors' taste and time.Figures 5.1 and 5.2 show Christian Cosas's site, which makes excellent use of images.

Figure 5.1. The splash page for Christian Cosas's personal home page uses a simple image against a plain background. Both the image and the text link point to the site's table of contents, shown in Figure 5.2.


Figure 5.2. The site includes linked images—the words are all image files. With 11 images on the page including the background, the whole page weighs in at only 27k.


How do you use images well? By making them an integral part of the design of the page, and not by adding them willy-nilly. We've all seen pages with dancing chili peppers sitting beside headlines for no apparent reason—not so good.

In this chapter, we'll find out how to place an image, how to resize it, and how to add a border. We'll discuss image file formats and image alignment, as well as how to make images work with slow connections. And we'll find out about integrating external editors—including Fireworks—with Dreamweaver, so that you can easily edit images while you're making pages.

Tip

To find out about using background images, refer to Chapter 3.


Tip

For instructions on making an image map, see Appendix A on the Web site.



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