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Chapter 13. Framing Pages

Chapter 13. Framing Pages

Web pages that use frames can be extremely versatile, because they allow you to keep parts of your Web site stationarymdash;such as a logo or some navigation bars—while allowing others to change their content. Using frames, you don't have to place the same elements onto every Web page that you build, and the viewer won't have to reload them each time in the browser. A frames-based page is divided into several windows within windows, like the panes in an old-fashioned window (Figure 13.1). Frames pages can also blur obvious borders (Figure 13.2).

Figure 13.1. Each frame is a distinct document with its own content—including different link and background colors and background images. When you click a link in one frame, the content appears in another window.


Figure 13.2. Designer Derek Powazek uses unusual frames layouts such as this one in his storytelling site The Fray (http://www.fray.com). The picture on the left stays visible while you scroll through the story on the right.


Although a frames-based page acts like a single Web page, each frame contains a single HTML document that can include completely separate contents and independent scrollbars.

The glue that holds together these documents is called the frameset definition document, or the frameset page; a frameset is a set of frames, and the frameset page is what defines them as a set.


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