• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 19. Parent/Child Lingo > Object-oriented programming

Object-oriented programming

The Lingo we've used up to this point is powerful and, placed in a historical perspective, very sophisticated. The use of handlers and functions in Lingo makes it a structured language. Essentially, structured languages allow you to include some specific functionality in your code by writing handlers (or buying them) to perform the action. You can then call the handlers from anywhere in your movie. If you need the same functionality in another movie, you can copy those handlers and place them in your new movie. Structured programming gives you the ability to write extremely complex applications productively. And that's what it's all about—being able to create the applications you want in a timely manner.

However, as programs grew ever more sophisticated and complex, even structured programming couldn't provide the basis for the productivity that was needed. Thus, object-oriented programming, or OOP, was born. Whereas structured programming allows you to localize a functionality in a handler (other programming languages call them functions, procedures, or subroutines), object-oriented programming allows you to encapsulate both instructions (handlers) and data into an object.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint