• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 20. Director and Digital Video > Working with digital video

Working with digital video

In the preceding chapter, you studied the role of digital audio in your Director productions. Now that we're moving on to digital video, keep in mind that the two have a lot in common: Both try to place a time-based medium in the midst of a frame-based medium, and both can be created by a large number of applications at various compression and quality settings. But when it comes to digital video, you're confronted with many more aspects to control than you are with digital audio. This may seem overwhelming at first, but actually it's liberating; in fact, some programmers choose to place their sounds in nonvideo form (sounds without images) because of the greater control they can wield over playback.

In the next few pages, we'll be looking at the methodology of working with digital video, primarily with the two most common digital video types: QuickTime and AVI. AVI (which stands for audio video interleave) is sometimes also known as Video for Windows, or VFW. Other digital video file types include QTVR (QuickTime Virtual Reality) and QD3D (QuickDraw 3D). On the Macintosh, you can import MPEG files if you have installed the QuickTime MPEG extension. On Windows computers, an Xtra such as the MPEG Xtra or DirectMedia Xtra is required to play MPEGs.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint