• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Chapter 5. Working with Images > Using Images on the Web

Using Images on the Web

Adding an image to a Web page is remarkably easy. Basically, you create a link between the page and a graphics file, and the picture appears on your Web page. But like other things on the Web, there are a few rules that make that straightforward process a bit more complicated. In other words, you need to know a bit about image formats and loading characteristics before you go dropping them onto your Web pages.

Web image formats

The two most common image types, or formats, on the Web are GIF (Graphic Interchange Format) and JPEG (Joint Photographic Experts Group). GIF and JPEG account for almost all of the still images on the Web. All browsers support both formats. You can also use the newer PNG (Portable Network Graphics) format, which is supported by current versions of Internet Explorer and some versions of Netscape Communicator. PNG, like GIF, supports 256 colors, and compresses them without the patented compression method used by GIF. Trouble is, PNG is not as universally supported as GIF, and so isn't used a great deal. Other file formats, such as QuickTime and PDF (Portable Document Format) are viewed with Web browser plug-ins. I discuss them more fully in Chapter 13, "Working with Rich Media." In this chapter, I describe how to add and use static GIF and JPEG images in your Web pages. All the rules apply to both formats.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint