• Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint
Share this Page URL
Help

Lesson 5. Adding Interactivity

Lesson 5. Adding Interactivity

In this lesson, you complete the Taj Mahal travelog project you've been working on for the past two lessons. You'll create a menu and buttons for the presentation and then use Lingo, Director's scripting language, to add interactivity. Interactive movies involve users by allowing them to click images to explore other parts of the movie or to exit when they are ready. Typically, this kind of user interaction is provided in Director movies through a written instruction called a script. Scripts are written in a Script window using commands and words that are part of Lingo. In Lesson 9, you'll learn to use prewritten scripts from the behavior library.

Figure . By adding just a few concluding interactive elements, you can bring your Director movies to a smooth close. To complete the Taj Mahal travelog, you'll create a simple menu with interactive buttons that let users decide what parts of the movie to view. By adding Lingo scripts to the button cast members, you provide the interactivity that displays another segement of the movie or lets users exit the movie.


In the tasks in this lesson, you'll write two simple Lingo scripts for the Credits and Quit buttons of the Taj Mahal travelog. The scripts you write will allow users to click the Credits button to see another screen you'll build for the presentation and to click the Quit button to quit the presentation. You'll also add other Lingo scripts to the score in the behavior channel that help you display the screen containing the buttons when you want it to appear in the movie.

Buttons are important features in interactive presentations because they are the keys to navigating through the presentation. With button scripts, Director moves the playback head to another frame in the movie or executes other commands included in the script. Whenever a script instructs Director to move the playback head to another frame, the playback head actually moves, or branches, to another frame and then can return to the original frame through the instructions of another script. You'll see how easy it is to implement branching in your movies by working through the tasks in this lesson. Once you've finished the travelog presentation, you'll create a stand-alone projector so users can view and interact with the movie without having to install Director.

If you would like to view the final result of this lesson, open the Complete folder in the Lesson05 folder and play TajMah3.dir.


PREVIEW

                                                                          

Not a subscriber?

Start A Free Trial


  
  • Creative Edge
  • Create BookmarkCreate Bookmark
  • Create Note or TagCreate Note or Tag
  • PrintPrint