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Third-Party Content

When you visit a Web site, typically two parties are involved: You are the first party, and the Web site you are visiting is the second party. But third parties can also be involved. For example, sometimes an ad appears as an image on the Web site. The ad could be coming directly from the Web site you know you are visiting, or it could be loading from another company's Web site. In this case, the technical details are simple. Consider this: The HTML code that creates the Web site uses links to find all the images it loads. Most of the links point to the Web site you know you are visiting. However, there are times when the link points to another organization's Web site. Whenever a Web site loads content such as images or sounds from a third-party site, you are no longer just visiting the Web site you intended to. Now you have been subjected to third-party content, which is just the same as if you had visited that third-party Web site directly.

Third-party content can come in many forms. It can be images or sounds loaded into your browser, or it might be other active content, such as ActiveX or Java. What you should be concerned about is cookies and Web bugs that come from third parties. We will discuss these more in the next few sections.


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